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Leticia Bonilla

ISP Winter 2004

Nutrition

 

Unit Overview

 

            This two week unit is specifically designed for first grade students.  Throughout the student’s years in the elementary school system, a student will be exposed to various learning experiences regarding health, environmental issues, and how to prevent certain behaviors that will affect them as they grow and become adults.  A child must learn to disseminate information and hopefully capture what is the most important and applicable to their lives at the present time. 

            The purpose of this unit is to teach students about Nutrition by utilizing the Food Pyramid and to promote a healthy lifestyle.  If children begin to learn how important it is to always make the appropriate choices when eating they will definitely begin to find a new appreciation for themselves, and begin to feel comfortable in their own bodies.  My goal in teaching children about proper nutrition is to prevent obesity and other health problems that can result from not making the appropriate food choices.  Many studies have proven that we have become an obese nation.  By becoming an obese nation we have definitely encountered many negative consequences, such as heart disease.  As teachers, parents, and role models we must ensure that children are getting the proper nutritional education so that they me be empowered to make their own wise decisions regarding food choices as they are growing.  The focus should lie primarily on learning how to adjust their lifestyles in order to live a balanced and healthy life while incorporating food that is important to their culture.  I believe it is crucial to teach students at a very young age a simple and basic decision making process when they are forced to make choices over what they will eat.  It is important to promote a healthy lifestyle rather than making students feel like they are on a diet.  Eating healthy should be fun, everyone should enjoy it!  Teaching students about the Food Pyramid will be crucial in order for the students to understand how the nutrients that is in each category of the five food groups are important for them to be healthy and keep their bodies moving.  It also helps them to make a connection and begin applying it immediately in their lives.  My soul purpose is for my students to experience a life-long learning process that hopefully in the long run they will make wiser choices about what it is they are putting in their bodies.

5 Unit Learning Goals

1.)  Students will be able to name the Five Food Groups.

 

2.)  Students will be able to identify the correct number of recommended servings of each Fruit, Vegetable, and Grain Group.

 

3.)  Students will be able to define the Five a Day concept.

 

4.)  Students will recognize and describe the physical features of different foods.

 

5.)  Students will identify a favorite healthy snack food from the Five Food Groups.

 

Instructional Overview

 

            This unit was designed so that students are more aware of what nutrients their bodies need in order to maintain healthy.  Implementing an activity in the classroom should definitely be timed and planned.  Young children, especially those in the lower grades have a very short attention span.  The activities utilized should be enjoyable for children so that they do not get bored and feel like promoting a healthy lifestyle is a burden.  The approach that I have used when planning this unit is a deductive approach which proceeds from generalizations to their application in specific instances.  I felt it was important to utilize the deductive approach because the knowledge introduced earlier in the lessons are later applied to specific situations, such as learning how to pick a healthy snack based on the Food Groups.  Also, the lesson plans in this unit are geared towards cooperative learning in where everyone shares a common goal, and shares their ideas in order to have the group become more self-reflective and aware of their own performance. 

 

     In the first lesson the students are introduced to the foundation of the entire unit which is naming the five food groups and placing their position on the Food Pyramid.  I begin with an opener in order to gain the attention of the students.  For example, “Did you know that our bodies are like cars?”  They will be puzzled by such a comment.  I will then proceed by explaining that just like cars need gas for a car to run, food is like gas for the human body!!  Students will be asked to name healthy foods that will enable their body to function.  This discussion will assist the students in comprehending why healthy foods from the food groups are crucial to eat. The responses will be written on the board and most of the items will be discussed in terms of the nutrients they provide. I will pick a few of the items and explain that we cannot just eat ten apples a day and maintain healthy.  We need to eat from all five food groups in order to obtain the nutrients that are needed to get energy, protein, vitamins, minerals, and fiber.  Next, I will hand the students a worksheet that has the appropriate servings of each food group.  This worksheet will be their first introduction to the Food Pyramid.  I will ask the students to name the three food groups we should eat from the most of in a one day based on the worksheet.  After they have responded, I will make sure to tell them that while it is important for us to eat from the vegetable, fruit, and grain group everyday, we must not neglect and ignore the other two groups.  In order to maintain healthy we must eat from all five groups.  The next activity will incorporate fun and will help students to envision what a Food Pyramid looks like in larger version.  With the help of my students I will make a Food Pyramid on the floor in the middle of the classroom by utilizing masking tape.  I will make the size big enough for one student to fit in each food group.  I will label each food group appropriately: Dairy, meat, grain, fruit, and vegetable.  By making a large Food Pyramid students will be able to connect the importance of each Food Group due to the size given for each.  In order to make the experience come to life and have students make a connection I will bring several items from all five food groups.  I will ask the students to sit around the large pyramid and ask them what food item I have in my hand.  Once they answer correctly I will call on a volunteer to stand in the proper food group in which the item represents.  This activity will assist the students to classify selected foods by food groups.

 

     In the second lesson students will be able to identify the correct number of recommended servings of each Fruit, Vegetable, and Grain Group.  My goal in this lesson is to have students envision what a serving consists of by connecting what their prior knowledge of the servings they should be eating a day from the Food Pyramid on the floor and the worksheet they were given.  It is important for them to visualize the servings by quantity so that they may apply it to their real life eating habits.  I will also ensure to incorporate the diversity of cultures in the class by utilizing foods that the students will recognize.  I will begin by reminding them and reinforcing that it is important we eat at least two servings of fruit, three servings of vegetables, and six servings of grains every day.  In order to clarify what makes up a serving I will illustrate on the board specific measurements.  For example, for the fruit portion I write one medium whole fruit, and ½ cup of chopped fruit.  For the Vegetable I will write 1 cup raw and ½ up cooked and for the grains portion I will write 1 slice of bread, one tortilla, ½ cup of cooked rice, and ½ cup of cereal.  Hopefully I have touched on foods that everyone is familiar with!  Next, I will have two measuring cups where I will measure cereal. One will be 1 cup the other will be 1 ½ cups.  I will ask the students to discuss with me the difference in size of both measuring cups.  This exercise will enable them to see the portions needed to satisfy the six grains they should be eating a day.  Finally, the students will be placed groups of three and each student will get the opportunity to pour the amount of cereal they normally eat in a bowl and measure the amount they poured to the correct amount of recommended serving.  The students will be surprised to see that it is not that difficult to eat six grains if they incorporate cereal into their breakfast, a sandwich with bread for lunch, and if they have rice for dinner.  Students will also become familiar with combination foods by explaining to them that by eating foods like pizza, enchiladas, or chicken stir-fry with vegetables they are eating from more than one food group.  I will explain that if you eat for example chicken stir-fry with vegetables you are satisfying the meat, vegetable, and grain portion of the food groups.  For an activity, I will ask students to name different food combinations and we will write on the board what food groups they belong in.  My next goal in this section is to have the students obtain their healthy eating goals.  Each student will have a booklet where they may place their name on their front page.  Inside they will have a place for the Fruit food group.  The will draw a picture of two fruits they love to eat to satisfy the food group.  The same will be done for the vegetable and grain food groups.  The object is for the students to make a personal goal on what foods they love to eat that fit into these categories, and try to eat these foods as required.

 

     Utilizing their prior knowledge and being able to identify the Food Groups and the proper servings that each food group contains from the previous lessons, students are now ready to be introduced to the Five a Day concept.  The third lesson is extremely important because it reinforces what the students have been learning in the previous lessons and allows them to utilize the knowledge that has been acquired until now.  This activity will be used so that students will define the five a day concept.  I will begin by reinforcing and discussing with the class why it is very important to eat from the five food groups especially the fruits and vegetables.  Our body needs over 40 nutrients for good health and no one food contains the nutrients.   I will ask the class to recall the five food groups as I write them on the board along with the minimum servings for each.  Next the students will be prompted to raise their fingers when asked how many minimum servings of Vegetables they should eat in one day.  All students should raise up three fingers.  Next they will be asked how many servings of Fruits they should eat in one day utilizing their other hand.  They will raise two fingers.  They should now have a total of five fingers in the air.  By now, I will let them know that they need a total of five servings of fruits and vegetable and we call it the “5 a Day” healthy eating plan.  In order for the students to apply their knowledge of this new concept, they will be asked to draw a picture of five fruits and vegetable they ate the day before to see if they completed their “5 a Day” healthy eating plans.  The students will know what they will need to work on to accomplish the “5 a day”.

 

     The students are now ready to experience first hand the different physical features of the different foods we have been talking about in the food groups.  These activities will assist with learning the different sizes and colors different foods have.  For the first activity, I will bring in apples of different color, sizes, and shapes.  I will allow the students to observe the apples.  Next, the students will be asked to name the differences and I will write them on the board.  I will discuss why one apple could be named many different names and why they could come in many different sizes and colors in contrast to a banana, which their sizes only vary slightly.  Secondly, utilizing their prior knowledge from the “5 a Day” concept, I will show the students a “Color Wheel” with different colors.  As I spin the wheel and it lands on a color, the students will be asked to name as many different fruits and vegetables corresponding to the color.  The responses are recorded on the board.  Once we are all finished with the lessons, as a reward the apples are cut and are shared by the students.  For the final activity, I will bring to class different fruits and vegetables which will consist of apples, bananas, oranges, celery, carrots, red and green pepper.  I will discuss with the students the important nutrients that each item represents and I will ask the students to describe the fruits and vegetables that are being passed around the class for the class to see, touch the textures, and smell the items.  The responses will be recorded on the board.  This activity will assist the students to learn with their five senses and will intrigue their curiosity.

 

     The final lesson will incorporate all the food groups we have learned in the previous lessons and with that acquired knowledge, the students will be able to designate healthy snacks that are good for them to eat.  The activity designated for this lesson is explaining to the students and listing on the board a Healthy Snack Checklist.  A healthy snack must include three items:  Must be from the Five Food Groups, Low in added salt, and Low in added sugars.  The students will be asked to stand if the snack item meets the first item on the checklist.  The student will be asked to stand and raise one hand if the snack item meets two items on the check list.  And finally, the student will be asked to stand and raise both hands if the snack item meets all three items on the check list.  The students will get a chance to get their blood flowing by having the opportunity to stand and sit.  In the second activity, students are asked to draw a picture of their favorite healthy snack.  The snack must be from one of the five food groups, and must be low in salt and sugar.  The students will label their drawing as a secret snack.  After everyone is finished with their drawing, the students are placed into groups and are asked to have the other members of the groups to guess what their secret snack is, and what food group it represents.  The students will be allowed to interact with each other and talk about why they like a particular healthy snack over another.  At this point, since the students all come from diverse backgrounds, this is a great opportunity for them to speak about what they like to eat that maybe other children haven’t tasted due to different cultures.  Finally, this next activity will connect from the previous activity because students will be able to express their feeling about why they like and dislike certain foods, what factors influence their decision making process when choosing certain snacks, and how many items could be turned into healthy snacks.  I will allow the students to explore their different ideas of which foods taste great from each food group and their responses will be recorded on the board. At this time, I will explain to the students that everyone has different preferences just like we all have preferences in a favorite color or music.  The students will begin to understand the factors that influence them when making certain food choices.  I will continue to explore these feelings with the students as I write on the board the following questions:  1.)  What kinds of foods do you eat when you are happy? 2.) What kinds of foods do you eat when you are sick? 3.)  What do you eat when you are bored?  As the responses are listed on the board, students will be able to connect what factors influence them when making food choices, as well as their likes and dislikes.  We will then talk about the food choices listed and how we could change some of the habits to eat healthier foods such as carrot sticks and a banana.

Assessment Plan

 

     I believe students have different styles of learning and retaining information.   Some students are visual, some need to write things down, and others can grasp the information by simply listening.  I believe when teaching younger students, it is important to incorporate fun and play in the lessons.  Utilizing student self-assessment is vital because they become involved in developing assessment criteria in regards to what they are learning.  A good example of this is to have the children keep a weekly log to monitor what they are eating on a daily basis.  By keeping a log, they are definitely aware of their progress and they are able to know where they stand at all times independently.  It is important for a student to monitor themselves because they can earn points or rewards for doing an excellent job.  Children love to receive praise for their work, and if they know they are keeping up with their progress they are encouraged to keep doing a great job and begin develop a sense of accomplishment.  The techniques that have been utilized for assessment in this unit is a lot of personal communication, and informal and formal assessment.    For personal communication, I have ensured that students are able to talk about their feelings regarding certain foods and their background.  I will also utilize worksheets where they will be allowed to color and use art as a form of assessment.  For example, I will hand out a worksheet with the Food Pyramid that allows for the Pyramid pieces to be cut.  I will ask the children to color each food group a designated color and cut the pieces with scissors.  I will then call out food names and have the children raise up the correct color of the Pyramid piece that belongs to each designated food group.  Secondly, the students will be given a worksheet that has pictures of healthy and unhealthy food choices from each food group.  The students will be asked to circle the proper healthy snack from each food group.  This assessment will provide evidence that the students can identify the healthy food choices over the unhealthy ones.  Throughout each lesson I will make sure that each student has had a turn to voice their opinion and answer questions.  Students will be asked to name how many servings for each food group, and list their favorite food from each designated food group.  The students will also get a chance to differentiate between features of fruits and vegetables by viewing 3 different vegetable and 2 different fruits displayed in the front of the class.  The students will be asked to describe the color, shape, and size of each item displayed.  This assessment will provide evidence that the students can identify physical features of different fruits and vegetables.  Group discussions are also an essential assessment technique of this unit.  A group discussion promotes thinking aloud and learning to accept and respect other student’s points of views and values while maintaining their own views. 

     The final assessment of this unit will be the formal assessment.  The formal assessment will include a quiz.  The quiz will consist of questions designed to find evidence if the students are able to name the Five Food Groups and place their position on the Food Pyramid, if the students will be able to identify the correct number of recommended servings of each Fruit, Vegetable, and Grain Group, if the students demonstrate knowledge and become familiar with the Five a Day concept, if the students are able to recognize and describe the physical features of different foods, and finally if the students are able to identify a favorite healthy snack food from the Five Food Groups.

 

Lessons

 

Grade: First

Unit Topic:  Nutrition - Food Pyramid

Lesson:  Introduction to the Food Pyramid

Time:  40 minutes

Lesson #1

 

Objectives:

1.)  The learner will be able to identify healthy foods that enable their body to function.

2.)  The learner will identify how much food should be eaten from each food group.

3.)  The learner will classify selected food by food groups.

 

Activity/Procedure:

-         The teacher will begin by gaining the attention of my students by making a comment, “Did you know that our bodies are like cars?”  They will be puzzled by such a comment.  I will then proceed by explaining that just like cars need gas for a car to run, food is like gas for the human body!! 

-         Students will be asked to name healthy foods that will enable their body to function.  The responses will be written on the board and most of the items will be discussed in terms of the nutrients they provide.

-         The teacher will hand the students a worksheet that has the appropriate servings of each food group. 

-         The students will be asked to name the three food groups we should eat the most of in a one day. 

-         With the help of the students, the teacher will make a Food Pyramid on the floor in the middle of the classroom by utilizing masking tape.  The Food Pyramid will be big enough for one student to fit in each food group. 

-         The teacher will bring several items from all five food groups.  The students will be asked which food group each item represents.  The teacher will pick a volunteer to stand in the appropriate food group.

 

Assessment:

            The teacher will hand out a worksheet with the Food Pyramid that allows for the Pyramid pieces to be cut.  The students will be asked to color each food group a designated color and cut the pieces with scissors.   The teacher will call out food names and have the children raise up the correct color of the Pyramid piece that belongs to each designated food group.

 

 

 

Grade: First

Unit Topic:  Nutrition - Food Pyramid

Lesson:  Proper Serving Sizes from the Food Groups

Time:  40 minutes

Lesson #2

 

Objectives:

1.)  The learner will identify the proper measurement of servings for each food group.

2.)  The learner will demonstrate knowledge of combination foods.

3.)  The learner will list their personal goals when eating from each of the food groups.

 

Activities/Procedures:

-         The teacher will illustrate on the board specific measurements.  For example, for the fruit portion one medium whole fruit, and ½ cup of chopped fruit. 

-         The teacher will ask the students to discuss the difference in size of both measuring cups. 

-         The students will be placed groups of three and each student will get the opportunity to pour the amount of cereal they normally eat in a bowl and measure the amount they poured to the correct amount of recommended serving.

-         The teacher will introduce the concept of combination foods.

-         The students will be asked to name different food combinations and the responses will be written on the board according to what food groups they belong in.

-         Students will be asked to create a “Personal Healthy Eating Goal Booklet.”  Inside they will have a place for the Fruit food group.  They will draw a picture of two fruits they love to eat to satisfy the food group.  The same will be done for the vegetable and grain food groups.

 

Assessment:

Students will be asked to name how many servings for each food group, and list their favorite food from each designated food group.

 

 

 

Grade: First

Unit Topic:  Nutrition - Food Pyramid

Lesson:  Five a Day Concept

Time:  40 minutes

Lesson #3

 

Objectives:

1.)  The learner will be able to define what is a “Five a Day” healthy eating plan.

2.)  The learner will be able to differentiate between a variety of fruit and vegetable selections.

3.)  The learner will be able list the Five Food Groups and why they are important.

 

 

Activities:

-         The teacher will begin instruction by reinforcing and discussing with the class why it is very important to eat from the five food groups especially the fruits and vegetables. 

-         The teacher will ask the class to recall the five food groups as they are written on the board along with the minimum servings for each. 

-         Next the students will be prompted to raise their fingers when asked how many minimum servings of Vegetables they should eat in one day.  

-         Next they will be asked how many servings of Fruits they should eat in one day utilizing their other hand.  They will raise two fingers.  They should now have a total of five fingers in the air.  By now, I will let them know that they need a total of five servings of fruits and vegetable and we call it the “5 a Day” healthy eating plan. 

-         The students will be asked to draw a picture of five fruits and vegetable they ate the day before to see if they completed their “5 a Day” healthy eating plans. 

 

Assessment:

 The students will be asked list five fruits and vegetables and draw a picture of it.  This will provide evidence that the student understands the concept of the “5 a Day” of fruits and vegetables.

 

 

Grade: First

Unit Topic:  Nutrition - Food Pyramid

Lesson:  Physical Features of Different Fruits and Vegetables

Time:  30 minutes

Lesson #4

 

Objectives:

1.)  The learner will be able to differentiate color, size, and shape of fruits and vegetables.

2.)  The learner will be able to describe different fruits and vegetables by color utilizing the color wheel.

3.)  The learner will be able to describe the fruits and vegetable showed to them by what texture they feel, and how they smell.

-         The teacher will bring in apples of different color, sizes, and shapes so that the students observe the differences. 

-         The students will be asked to name the differences and the responses will be written on the board.  The teacher will discuss why one apple could be named many different names and why they could come in many different sizes and colors in contrast to a banana, which their sizes only vary slightly.

-         The teacher will show the students a “Color Wheel” with different colors.  As the teacher spins the wheel and it lands on a color, the students will be asked to name as many different fruits and vegetables corresponding to the color.  The responses are recorded on the board.  Once the lessons have been finished, as a reward the apples are cut and are shared by the students.

-         The teacher will bring to class different fruits and vegetables which will consist of apples, bananas, oranges, celery, carrots, red and green pepper.  The teacher will discuss with the students the important nutrients that each item represents.   

-         The students will be asked to describe what they see as the fruits and vegetables are being passed around the class for the class to see, touch the textures, and smell the items.  The responses will be recorded on the board.  This activity will assist the students to learn with their five senses and will intrigue their curiosity.

 

Assessment:

In the front of the classroom, there will be 3 different vegetable and 2 different fruits displayed.  The students will be asked to describe the color, shape, and size of each item displayed.  This exercise will provide evidence that the students can identify physical features of different fruits and vegetables.

 

 

Grade: First

Unit Topic:  Nutrition - Food Pyramid

Lesson:  Identifying Healthy Snack Foods

Time:  45 minutes

Lesson #5

 

Objectives:

1.)  The learner will be able to identify a healthy snack from the Food Groups.

2.)  The learner will be able to name healthy snacks from viewing their classmates “Secret Snacks”

3.)  The learner will be able to identify the factors that influence them when choosing to eat a certain snack.

 

Activities:

-         The teacher will open the discussion with the students by asking them what their idea of a healthy snack is.

-         The teacher will explain to the students what a healthy snack includes and list on the board a Healthy Snack Checklist.  A healthy snack must include three items:  Must be from the Five Food Groups, Low in added salt, and Low in added sugars.

-         The students will be asked to stand if the snack item meets the first item on the checklist.  The student will be asked to stand and raise one hand if the snack item meets two items on the check list.  And finally, the student will be asked to stand and raise both hands if the snack item meets all three items on the check list. 

-         Students will be asked to draw a picture of their favorite healthy snack.  The snack must be from one of the five food groups, and must be low in salt and sugar. 

-         The students will label their drawing as a secret snack.  After everyone is finished with their drawing, the students are placed into groups and are asked to have the other members of the groups to guess what their secret snack is, and what food group it represents.  The students will be allowed to interact with each other and talk about why they like a particular healthy snack over another.

-         The teacher will open discussion allowing the students to explore their different ideas of which foods taste great from each food group and their responses will be recorded on the board.

-         The teacher will write the following questions on the board in order to promote discussion of what they are currently eating.  1.)  What kinds of foods do you eat when you are happy? 2.) What kinds of foods do you eat when you are sick? 3.)  What do you eat when you are bored? 

-         The teacher will interact with the students as they talk about the food choices listed and how they could change some of the habits to eat healthier foods such as carrot sticks and a banana.

 

Assessment:

The students will be given a worksheet that has pictures of healthy and unhealthy food choices from each food group.  The students will be asked to circle the proper healthy snack from each food group.  This assessment will provide evidence that the students can identify the healthy food choices over the unhealthy ones.