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EDCI 402: Introduction to Instructional Design, Assessment and Classroom Management Methods (4 Units)

Restricted to pre-service candidates to be taken in Block 1 of the Multiple Subjects Certification program. Prerequisites: Admission to the program and completion of EDCI 300.

 

Instructor: Dr. John Shindler

E-mail: jshindl@calstatela.edu

Office phone: 323-343-5824

Office Location: KH A2045

Office Hours: 3:00-4:00 T,W,Th

http://www.calstatela.edu/faculty/jshindl

 

SCHEDULE:

Week

Topics

Readings and Assignments

1

Overview of class

Learning Styles exercise

 

Learning Style Packet

PLSI Materials

Teaching across type reading (appendix)

2

Teacher Values Exercise

Intro. to Classroom Management

Socially Constructed Reality

Language and Management

Teacher Power

Basic Needs

 

Curwin Ch’s 3,4 (review 1,2)

Readings in Course Pack

Week 2 Packet Readings

Teacher Power

3

 

Discipline with Dignity Video

Social Contract

Management Role Play – Level I

Level II problem behaviors

CMP workshop

 

Borich Ch. 10 (optional)

Curwin  Ch’s 5,6

Week 3 Packet Readings

Chapter 13 - implementation

4

Dweck Research

Planning and Curriculum Choices

Learning Models (Bloom, Wirtz, etc.)

Writing Objectives

 

Borich Ch’s. 2 and 3

Handouts in Course Packet

Week 4 packet Readings

 

5

Anyon Research

Outcomes: Vertical and Horizontal

Matching Assessment Targets and Methods

ISP Workshop

 

Anyon Reading

Borich Ch. 4

Stiggins Ch. 4 (in course pack)

Week 5 Packet Readings

6

ISP workshop (rough draft of outline and topic due)

Managing Cooperative Classroom

Cooperative Learning

Social Learning Theory

Learning Stations

 

Borich Ch. 9

Readings in Course Pack

Week 6 Packet Readings

Outline Due (1pt)

7

Instruction for Success Psychology

Intro. to Lesson Plan

Direct Instruction Methods

How Instruction Relates to Management

 

Borich Ch. 5

Readings in Course Pack

Week 7 packet Readings

Classroom Management Plan (CMP) Due

Examples from past EDCI 402 classes

8

Cognitive Processes of Learning

Assessing Reasoning

Concept Attainment

ISP Workshop

 

Borich Ch. 6

Wirtz Article

Readings in Course Pack

Week 8 Packet Readings

ISP outline due (1pt)

 

 

9

Authentic Assessment

ISP Assessment Workshop

Computer-based grade program use

 

Authentic Assessment Reading

Borich Ch. 13

Week 9 Packet Readings

Journals Due

ISP lesson draft of lesson plan(s) due (1pt)

 

10

Technical Management

Dealing with the Difficult Student/Negative ID cycle

Review for Final

 

Instructional Strategies Plan (ISP) Due
Example ISPs and Units

 

Week 10 Packet Readings

11

Collaborative Final Exam

Research on Collaborative exams

 

 

EDCI 402: Journal Entries/Reflection Questions

 

Journal Entry #1

Bring to mind a student that you seem to have particular difficulty in understanding and/or relating to, then one for whom you seem to have a natural affinity.  Do you think Cognitive/Learning Style has something to do with how well you relate to each of these students?  If so, what implications does that have for your teaching?

 

Journal Entry #2

From your observations, experiences and/or memories characterize what you see as the typical types of teaching methods taking place in schools.  What are your reactions to what you see? What would you do differently?

 

Journal Entry #3

From your observations, experiences and/or memories characterize the use of assessment that you observe taking place.  Are the assessment methods well matched to the instructional targets? Are students well served by the assessment being used?

 

Journal Entry #4

Select one class from your observations, experiences and/or memories, and assess how well the teacher did in meeting the student’s needs. Did the pedagogy promote internal locus of control, a sense of acceptance and belonging, and a mastery orientation?

Or

For that same class, discuss the relationship between the quality of teaching and the amount of classroom management problems. Would you say that they were related and why?

 

Journal Entry #5

React to the Anyon article. Do you see it as a valid reality in our schools?

 

Journal Entry #6

From your observations, experiences and/or memories characterize the use of cooperative learning in schools that you have observed. Is it used in a meaningful way? Is it used often? What suggestions would you offer the teachers that you have seen using it?

 

Journal Entry #7

From your observations, experiences and/or memories characterize the “classroom reality” of one class that you have observed. What were the most common forms of power used? What was the language like? What was the implicit/unspoken expectation that set the tone for the class?

 

Journal Entry #8

React to something that you have observed recently that has significantly affected you.

 

 


 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is intended to be taken in the first block of a candidate’s program and is designed to provide a theoretical and practical foundation for the pedagogical dimensions of the multiple subjects teacher credential program. Through an exploration of the fundamental principles of instructional design, assessment, and classroom management, candidates will obtain a solid grounding in basic teaching methods and the framework for their future coursework.  Through taking part in an active learner-centered synthesis of these three areas, candidates will better understand the inter-relationship between each, and how each relates to student achievement.

 

 

COURSE OUTCOMES and STANDARDS:

Content Standards: The following content will be covered in this course:

1.       Instructional design methodology including: lesson planning, interdisciplinary unit models and construction techniques, direct and indirect instructional models, creating behavioral objectives, aligning instructional outcomes with assessment, use of instructional technology, and how instruction effects classroom management (CCTC Standard 3c).

2.       Strategies for addressing learner needs and differences including: learning style models, learning psychology, behavioral taxonomies, multicultural considerations and effects of pedagogical choices on motivation (CCTC Standards 11b and 3b).

3.       Assessment methodology including: test item construction, questioning techniques, performance and authentic assessment, rubric construction, journal use, personal communication, interpretation of standardized tests and the place of assessment in planning (CCTC Standard 3c).

4.       Classroom management strategies including: creating a supportive healthy environment, developing a positive classroom social contract, creating positive expectations, boundaries and rules, using effective instructional, assessment and motivational practices that reduce the need for corrective action, understanding basic reasons why students misbehave, developing and implementing logical and related consequences to misbehavior and dealing with difficult students (CCTC Standard 10).

 

Performance Standards and Assessments: As a result of the course students will be able to demonstrate the following knowledge, skills, and dispositions shown by the assessment methods outlined below:

 

1.       Candidates will develop an integrated approach to instruction, assessment and classroom management that best fits their personal style and the learning needs of their students. This standard will be evidenced in the following performance indicators (TLW):

1.       Reflect on the implications of their incoming values, learning style, cultural background, ethnicity, and experience as these relate to their guiding principles and expectations for their teaching (CCTC TPE 12).

2.       Clearly define a personal approach to instruction that includes multiple models, methods and student considerations (CCTC TPE 9)

3.       Modify instruction as a result of acquiring knowledge of different student needs and learning styles (CCTC TPE 8)

4.       Construct learning activities that are logical, sequenced, student-centered, and aligned with learning objectives, planned assessments and state standards (CCTC TPE 4).

5.       Articulate strategies for addressing the needs of culturally diverse and special needs students. (CCTC TPE 4).

 

Assessments:

Candidates will demonstrate these competencies in course discussions, assignments and exams.  Candidates will be assigned specific field observation in which they will analyze how various instructional practices affect students as well as how student needs are accommodated.  Candidates will construct an integrated unit of instruction to be included in their program portfolio. In this unit they will include considerations for their teaching style, the needs of their students, and a vision for a successful classroom.

 

2.       Candidates will be able to develop, interpret and apply instructional design knowledge, incorporating a variety of models best suited to the learning context. This standard will be evidenced in the following performance indicators (TLW):

a)       Determine how to plan and if necessary modify instruction to promote student learning (CCTC TPE 2)

b)       Construct learning activities that promote student cognitive development, creativity and imagination (CCTC TPE 4).

c)       Construct well-designed, student outcome-based behavioral learning objectives within the context of long-term instructional planning (CCTC TPE 5).

d)       Use instructional materials that are best suited to promote student progress and meet state-adopted academic content (CCTC TPE 4)

e)       Develop a unit plan that includes both long-term and short term instructional planning (CCTC TPE 9).

f)         Formulate both direct and indirect instructional lessons and demonstrate a clear understanding of the instructional thinking required to teach concepts, procedures, facts, and skills (CCTC TPE 9).

g)       Demonstrate an understanding of how to consider instructional timing in their planning, and reflect on the time management choices of the teachers that they have observed (CCTC TPE 10).

h)       Collaborate with classmates in designing instruction and developing teaching strategies (CCTC TPE 11).

i)         Use technology to more effectively and creatively bring about student learning (CCTC TPE 4).

 

Assessments:

Candidates will demonstrate these competencies in course discussions, assignments and exams.  Candidates will be assigned specific field observation in which they will analyze instructional choices and their effects.  Candidates will construct an integrated unit of instruction including assessments, long-range and lateral outcomes and individual lessons to be included in their program portfolio.

 

3.       Candidates will be able to create and interpret a wide range of assessment methods and be able to integrate and align them with their learning outcomes and students’ needs. This standard will be evidenced in the following performance indicators (TLW):

a)       Incorporate assessment thinking as an integral part of their instructional planning process (CCTC TPE 3)

b)       Develop the appropriate forms of assessment instruments and methods including authentic assessment methods that best fit their instructional goals and student needs (CCTC TPE 3)

c)       Accurately interpret various forms of summative and formative assessment information (CCTC TPE 3).

d)       Develop and use assessments that are consistent with the state-adopted assessment program (CCTC TPE 3).

 

Assessments:

Candidates will demonstrate these competencies in course discussions, assignments and exams.  Candidates will be assigned specific field observation in which they will examine assessment practice.  Candidates will construct an integrated unit of instruction including a substantive section outlining how they will use a variety of assessment methods and strategies, including a substantive authentic assessment component, and articulate how those methods are aligned with their general instructional and student learning outcomes.

 

4. Candidates will be able to articulate and apply a variety of classroom management strategies that will promote a positive, efficient, healthy, and effective learning environment for their students. This standard will be evidenced in the following performance indicators (TLW):

a)       Develop a classroom plan that synthesizes their understanding of discipline theory and with an understanding of the relationship between classroom management, instruction and assessment (CCTC TPE 11).

b)       Outline a set of strategies to bring about a positive, motivational, healthy and productive learning environment (CCTC TPE 11).

c)       Identify practices and methodologies that foster high self-concept and success psychology in their students. (CCTC TPE 11).

d)       Synthesize course content, classroom observation and personal reflection to articulate a personal set of values and a vision for their future classroom (CCTC TPE 13).

 

Assessments:

Candidates will demonstrate these competencies in course discussions, assignments and exams.  Candidates will be assigned specific field observation in which they will be asked to analyze classroom management practices.  Candidates will construct a classroom management plan (CMP). The CMP will reflect the candidates’ ability to articulate both a theoretical and practical basis for successful management and will be included in their program portfolio.

 

Student Conduct

      It is assumed that you are a professional and will conduct yourself with the highest level of professionalism.  Given the large size of this class, it is especially important that students make every effort to be respectful of the learning environment, the professor and their fellow classmates.  Appropriate behavior will be discussed and modeled within the context of the course, and a self-conscious approach to large-scale learning environment management will be incorporated into classes as necessary.

 

Statement of Reasonable Accommodation

The Charter College of Education Faculty members fully support the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  The members of the faculty will provide reasonable accommodation to any student with a disability who is registered with the Office of Students Disabilities (OSD) and who needs and requests accommodation.  The faculty member may wish to contact to verify status and need for such an accommodation.  The OSD will be responsible for providing for the accommodation.


 

REQUIRED TEXTS AND READING:

Course Reading Packet: Available in the bookstore

 

Borich, G.D. (2000) Effective Teaching Methods.

 

Curwin and Mendler (1988) Discipline With Dignity

 

Other required reading will be provided in class

ALSO: You are encouraged to supplement this reading with readings from sources that enhances the course and provided an alternative perspective to the subject.

 

EVALUATION:

Assignments will be assessed and then given points according to how well they met the requirements in the guidelines .  Point values are assigned to each assignment (see Assignments section).  End of quarter grades will be awarded on the following percentage basis.

100 - 95 A

94.5 - 91 A-

90.5 - 88 B+

87.5 – 84  B

83.5 - 81 B-

80.5 – 78 C+

77.5 – 74 C

73.5 - 70 C-

70 -> E

 

 

Field Observations:

You are responsible for spending 4 hours in an elementary school observing. The requirements in Block 1 of the program include 8 hours total. Using the observations that you make in EDEL 405 for EDCI and visa versa is OK, as long as you attend to what you need to for each course and spend the full 8 hours. If you are not taking EDEL 405 concurrently, then just 4 hours of observation is required.

Use the observation time to inform your thinking for the journal reflections and your CMP.

Currently, you are responsible for obtaining your own observation site. CSLA will provide you with materials to give to those at the school to help you gain access and legitimacy and to verify your time spent there.

 

ASSIGNMENTS:

 

Journal Entries: 15 points

You are asked to make a journal entry for each of the first 8 weeks of the semester.  Journal prompts are listed on the final page of the syllabus and are available on the web site. Journals are due on the 9th week of the quarter. The following rubric will be used to assess each of the 8 entries.

 

 

Entry content assessment levels

2 pts

 

Response addresses the question given.  Incorporates concrete experiences to support ideas.  Draws conclusions about idea based on their current and/or previous experience. 

 

1 pt

Response attempts to address the question given. Incorporates concrete experiences to support ideas, or Draws conclusions about idea based on their current and previous experience only. 

 

.5 pt.

 

Response attempts to address the question given.

0 pts.

No Attempt

 

 

 

Instructional Strategies Plan Assignment  (40 pts.)

(Examples of previous units can be found on the course web site www.calstatela.edu/faculty/jshindl/402

 

Select a topic for a 2+ week unit

·          it should be something that is complex, laterally integrates content, and includes some form of student performance requiring authentic assessment.

·          you need to know this content or get to know it well so as to be able to operationalize it.

·          it should be something you want to actually teach someday.

 

Unit components

1.       A two paragraph overview (3 pts)

·          Purpose and topic of the lesson

·          A context and target grade level.

 

2.       5 unit learning goals (written in general outcome language, 2 pts)

 

3.       An instructional overview (9 pts)

·          You will need at least 2 pages here.

·          Generally explain how you intend to facilitate the instruction of your lessons.

·          Explain the learning and activity sequence you have chosen.  What are you trying to accomplish and why have you chosen to use the forms of instruction that you have (i.e., inductive, deductive, direct, learning centers, cooperative learning, etc.)

 

4.       A detailed explanation of all the assessment techniques you plan to incorporate during the unit (8 pts).

·          Include all the ways you plans to obtain evidence of student learning (i.e., personal communication, informal assessments, student self-assessments, etc.).

·          Provide a brief rationale of why you chose each method should be included, if it is not obvious.

·          Describe each method and explain how you will collect your assessment information, and how you will use it.

 

5.       An authentic/performance assessment instrument. (6 pts).

·          This can be a checklist, holistic rubric, or analytic/primary trait scale, but it must be appropriate to the task you are trying to assess.

·          Describe how you are going to collect your student performance data.

 

6.       5 or more individual lesson plans (12 pts).

·          Each plan requires at least 3 objectives.  These need to be stated in specific behavioral terms.

·          Use any format that you feel is best, but it should be functional (per our conclusions in class).

·          Address assessment

 

7. Rough drafts or ISP pieces and participation in peer assessment activities (3pts)

 

ISP Assessment Rubric

 

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Overview

2pts. Conveys purpose clearly. Notes target grade. Introduces why topic is of interest. Noted length of unit.

2pts. Conveys purpose. Notes target grade and length.

1pt. Introduces unit.

Unit Goals

2pts. Goals written in goal form.  Goals cover range of outcomes. State Standards are cited. All 5 goals are written clearly.

1pt. Goals are written.

 

Instructional

Overview

9pts. Instruction is explained in-depth.  Teacher facilitation is explained. Cognitive progression/structure of unit is apparent. Explanation of instructional choices is discussed. Language shows conceptual understanding.

7pts. Instruction is explained in-depth.  Teacher facilitation is explained. Cognitive progression/structure of unit is apparent.

4pts. Instructional activities are explained.  Teacher facilitation is explained.

Assessment

Overview

8pts. In-depth explanation of all the ways learning evidence will be obtained. Rationale for why selected assessments were chosen. An explanation of how the various pieces of evidence of learning will be collected. Methods well matched to the outcomes. Integrity/scheme to the section as a whole.

 

5pts. In-depth explanation of all the ways learning evidence will be obtained. Rationale for why selected assessments were chosen. An explanation of how the various pieces of evidence of learning will be collected.

3pts. Explanation of all the ways learning evidence will be obtained. An explanation of how the various pieces of evidence of learning will be collected.

Assessment

Instrument

6pts. A reliable scale is developed (detailed, concrete, well-designed). Scale is appropriate for task.  Task is explained clearly. Usage/data collection is explained clearly.

 

4pts. A reliable scale is developed (detailed, concrete). Scale is appropriate for task. Usage/data collection is explained.

2pts. A usable scale is developed. Scale is appropriate for task. Usage is explained.

Lesson Plans

10pts. At least 5 plans are developed. Plans are clearly explained so that another could use them.  Plans state 3 objectives written in correct format. Assessment is addressed. Plan format fits the proposed learning activities.

 

9pts. At least 4 plans are developed. Plans are clearly explained so that another could use them.  Plans state 3 objectives written in correct format.

6pts. At least 4 plans are developed. Plans are clearly explained.  Plans state 2 objectives.

Workshops

3 pts. Provides the rough drafts required for each of the 3 ISP workshops. Is prepared and takes part in each ISP. Takes their responsibility as a peer-assessor seriously and provides

2 pts. Provides rough drafts required for at least 2 ISP workshops. Is prepared and takes part in at least 2 ISP workshops.

1 pt Provides rough drafts required for at least 1 ISP workshop. Or is prepared and takes part in at least 2 ISP

 

Classroom Management Plan (CMP) – 30 points

Examples

The classroom management component of the course will culminate in each student’s development of his/her own personal classroom management plan (CMP).  The CMP will provide a venue for the synthesis of many of the ideas examined in the course, and should be included in each student’s programmatic portfolio.  While the careful examination and assessment of each plan would be ideal, the size of the class requires the need to use peer assessment to a greater extent and instructor assessment in a very limited capacity.  For this reason, and to provide a valuable form of processing, 3 workshop sessions will be incorporated near the end of the quarter (see calendar).  These sessions should provide each student adequate resources for the successful development of her/his plan and an opportunity to receive valuable peer and instructor feedback.

The CMP will be discussed in detail in class, however the following contents should be included in a successful plan:

 

A.      Theoretical Introduction

·         Philosophy of classroom management

·         Assumptions the nature of young people and learning

·         A discussion of theorists that clarify your perspective (a comparison of at least 3 theories would be sufficient here).

 

B.      Expectations/Policies/Rules/Boundaries

·         Expectations of students

·         Expectations of classroom climate

·         Rules and Policies (or how you plan to develop clear boundaries).

·         Are your expectations more student-centered (1 style) or teacher-centered (2 style)?

(This section can be developed in any way that best expresses your feelings about how expectations should be structured and communicated).

 

C.      Instructional and Assessment Strategies that Promote your Management Goals

·         What do you do instructionally to meet student’s academic needs?

·         What do you do instructionally to prevent students’ need to act out?

·         How does your assessment promote the goals of your management?

·         How do you allow for variable styles, cultures and circumstances in meeting the diverse needs of your students

 

D.      Motivation

·         From your point of view, what motivates students?

·         In the Short-term?

·         In the Long-term?

·         Why do/will your students do what you ask them to?

·         How do you plan to motivate your students?

·         How would you characterize your motivational style/approach?

 

E.      Vision

·         In about 2 pages, depict a typical day in your “ideal” class. See yourself one year from today, and explain how your class feels, what the students are doing, how you are acting, and how problems are dealt with. Here, you are clearly conceiving your ideal “socially constructed classroom reality.”  Have fun and dream.

 

Classroom Management Plan Assessment Rubrics (30 points total)

 

 

Excellent

Good

Problematic

Section A

7 pts. Includes a thoughtful and well-developed philosophy section.  Mentions assumptions about the nature of students.

4 pts. Includes a philosophy section.  Mentions assumptions about the nature of students. Discusses at least 1 theorist.

3 pts. Includes a philosophy section or  Mentions assumptions about the nature of students.

Section B

5 pts. Discusses how one intends to develop classroom expectations. Lists a sample of some possible rules/expectations. Mentions goals regarding classroom climate.

2 pts. Discusses how one intends to develop classroom expectations. Lists a sample of some possible expectations.

1 pts. Lists a sample of some possible expectations

Section C

7 pts. Substantively addresses all 4 questions listed in guidelines.

4 pts. Addresses some of the questions.

2 pts. Minimally address questions.

Section D

6 pts. Sets out a comprehensive plan to address issues of motivation. Discusses both long and short-term issues.

3 pts. Sets out  a well-developed plan to address issues of motivation.

1 pts. Sets out some plan to address issues of motivation.

Vision

5 pts. Uses an active voice. Takes nearly 2 pages to develop ideas. Creates a vivid picture.

3 pts. Takes over 1 page to develop ideas. Sincere effort.

2 pts. Some effort.

 

Final Exam – Collaborative Essay Format – 15 points

Groups of 1 to 5 will work collaboratively on a series of essay/performance assessment items.  Item review sheets will be disseminated before the exam.  All students are informally responsible for contributing to the group answers but are only formally responsible for submitting an individual set of written responses.  More information about this exam will follow.

 

Portfolio Evaluation:

You are required to submit your Block 1 program portfolio in this class at the end of the quarter as part of your overall program requirements. Guidelines will be provided.  Portfolios will be evaluated. A successful evaluation is required to be eligible to take Block 2 courses.

 

Attendance Policy

You are expected to attend class.  There is no substitute for attendance, what takes place in our 3 hours together each week is irreplaceable.  However, if you do for some reason miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact a classmate, find out what you missed and obtain any materials or notes that were given during the meeting.  Since it is impossible to replace the experience and participation that occurs during a class period, missing more than 1 class during the quarter assumes a loss of learning and performance, and therefore as a result there will be a subsequent loss of one grade (i.e., B to B-) per 2 classes missed. Each subsequent missed class results in another lowering of grade one unit. There is no such thing as an excused absence!!!  Being more than 20 minutes late will be recorded as a tardy which equals ½ of an absence. Leaving more that 20 minutes early will be recorded as a partial class and will be recorded as ½ of an absence.  You are adults and thus you do not need to ask permission to miss a class or a part of a class, but it is a courtesy to let the instructor know if you need to leave at the break for an emergency.

 

 

A Final Note

Every effort will be made to clarify assignments and points made in class.  Between written guidelines and explanations, what is expected of each student should be very clear.  But, if there is something that you do not understand, or something that you feel should be brought to my attention, please come to my office KH A2045 and discuss it with me or contact me at 343-5824 or jshindl@calstatela.edu.  I really do want to know your thoughts, concerns, questions and/or recent discoveries.  Don’t be shy!