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Step-by-Step Guide for Conversion

Step-By-Step Semester Conversion Guide

Step 1
Examine your program’s Student Learning Outcomes.

  • Are they written in clear terms?
  • Are they measurable and observable?

        - If yes, then proceed to Step 2.
        - If no, revise program SLO's. Assistance/resources available for this process will soon be linked           here.

Step 2
Examine your program’s goals and objectives.

  • Are these written in clear terms?
  • Do they meet state-of-the-art professional and disciplinary standards and, if appropriate, accreditation requirements?

        - If yes, proceed to Step 3.
        - If no, revise program goals and objectives. Assistance/resources available for this process will          soon be linked here.

Step 3
Look at existing program courses. Make a quick conversion from quarter to semester units.

  • Example: Undergraduate Program conversion

One undergraduate major is 76 quarter units (it consists of nineteen 4-unit courses). Those 76 units constitute 42% of the total degree units which is 180 quarter units. 4-unit quarter classes convert to 3-unit semester classes. Those nineteen 4-unit quarter classes become nineteen 3-unit semester classes. The total number of semester units becomes 57. Those 57 semester units are now 47% of the total degree units which is 120 semester units. In order to maintain the major at 42% of the total degree units the number of classes needs to be reduced to seventeen.

  • Example: 4-unit course conversion

A 4-unit quarter class is 40 hours of instructional time. A 3-unit semester class is 45 hours of instructional time. As one makes a quick conversion from quarter to semester units, each class has an additional 5 hours of instructional time; however, the program will have two less classes. The total number of instructional hours in the program is exactly the same. Decisions regarding how content will be distributed across two less classes, however, will require collaboration among all faculty teaching in the program.

Programs that have a year-long sequence of courses, (and, in some majors, a two-year sequence of classes) these convert easily to semesters. A fall-winter-spring sequence of 4-quarter unit classes becomes a fall-spring sequence of two 3-semester unit classes.

Step 4

Decide how much transformation you would like to make in the program. Options include course redesign, adding high impact practices, and embedded assessment. The Program and Course Redesign Checklist is provided as a possible guide to use during this process. It may be found here. Additional assistance/resources available for this will soon be linked here.

Step 5
Begin the process of designing the courses, keeping in mind the total unit count, for the program.

Step 6
Consult with faculty in any other departments/divisions/schools for which you offer service courses to ensure that the needs of students in that program will be met.

Step 7
Program curriculum is submitted to the departmental/division/school curriculum committee for discussion and review. Once it has been it approved it moves to the college level.

Step 8
Program curriculum is submitted to the college Dean’s Office and is sent out for consultation. The consultation period is 10 days. If there are no objections, it moves to the college level. If there are objections, there should be attempts to address those issues. If there are able to be resolved, the curriculum moves to the college level. If the issues are not resolved, all documentation of the objections is attached to program/course(s) and it moves to the college level.

Step 9
Program curriculum is submitted to the college curriculum committee for discussion and review. Once it has been it approved it moves to the university level.

Step 10
Curriculum is submitted either to the General Education Subcommittee, the Undergraduate Curriculum Subcommittee, or the Graduate Studies Subcommittee as appropriate. Once it has been approved it is sent to the Educational Policy Committee.

Step 11
Program curriculum is submitted to EPC for discussion and review. Any unresolved objections must be addressed at this level. Once the curriculum has been it approved it will be entered into the 2016-2017 semester catalog.