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Cal State L.A. Students Take Top Honors in System-Wide Competition (Again!)

Fourteen graduate students from Cal State L.A. were selected as Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholars during the system-wide Pre-Doctoral Program review process for academic year 2009 - 2010. Two hundred and fifty-eight students from the 23 CSU campuses applied for the awards and 70 students were selected as Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholars for Academic Year 2009 - 2010. The 14 students from Cal State L.A. represent, for the second year in a row, the largest group from any of the 23 CSU campuses to be selected for the awards. Students from Cal State L.A. received 20% of the total awards.

Pre-Doctoral Scholars receive $3000 which they can use for travel expenses to visit doctoral-granting institutions where they meet with potential mentors, to attend professional conferences where they present papers and again meet potential faculty mentors, to pay application fees to doctoral-granting institutions, and to pay for the GRE exam. Pre-Doctoral Scholars also receive a free GRE prep class and they have an opportunity for a paid research internship during the summer after the academic year.

Since 1998 over 130 students from Cal State L.A. have been recognized at Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholars. Over 50% of these students have entered top-ranked doctoral programs throughout the United States and in several foreign countries.

National Prize for Literary Magazine

Students from Cal State L.A. received the nation's highest honor given to a university literary magazine for Statement 2007: the Program Director's Prize for Content. The award was presented by the Association for Writers & Writing Programs (AWP), the national professional organization for writers in higher education and for university creative writing programs. The AWP sponsors a highly competitive annual contest called the National Program Directors' Prize, which is given to the best issue of a university literary magazine published in the nation in the previous year. A prize is given in each of two categories: Content and Design. More than 400 AWP member university programs were eligible to submit their literary magazines for the two prizes in this year's competition. A listing of member universities is available at the following link:

http://www.awpwriter.org/membership/memberprograms.php

One of the content judges stated, "This is a magazine that is inclusive of writers of all colors, classes, and geographies without practicing the fetishism of difference. High literary standards guide Statement's prose and poetry selections. Interviews with notable writers, such as Rita Dove, were balanced by the presentation of younger writers whose individual passions as writers offer the rich complexities of life in the 21st century."

Cal State L.A. Students Take Top Honors in System-Wide Competition

Eighteen Cal State L.A. students (17 graduate students and 1 undergraduate student) were selected as Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholars during the recent system-wide Pre-Doctoral Program review process. Two hundred and twenty students from the 23 CSU campuses applied for the awards and a total of 76 students were selected as Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholars for Academic Year 2008 - 2009. The 18 students from Cal State L.A. represent the largest group from any of the 23 CSU campuses to be selected for the awards. Students from Cal State L.A. received 23.5% of the total awards.

Pre-Doctoral Scholars receive $3000 which they can use for travel expenses to visit doctoral-granting institutions where they meet with potential mentors, to attend professional conferences where they present papers and again meet potential faculty mentors, to pay application fees to doctoral-granting institutions, and to pay for the GRE exam. Pre-Doctoral Scholars also receive a free GRE prep class and they have an opportunity for a paid research internship during the summer after the academic year.

Since 1998 over 120 students from Cal State L.A. have been recognized at Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholars. Fifty six percent of the students have entered top-ranked doctoral programs throughout the United States and in several foreign countries.

Visit http://www.calstate.edu/PreDoc/ for more information on the Pre-Doctoral Program.

MBA Graduate Students Win Outstanding Student - Written CASE Award

Five graduate students from the College of Business and Economics won the Outstanding Student-Written Case Award at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the North American Case Research Association (NACRA). The NACRA meeting is the most prestigious case research conference, and the students competed against doctoral and masters students from universities in the USA, Canada, Mexico, Europe, Australia, and Asia.

The winning case study was "American Apparel", by Cristina Eaves, Lisa Tousant, Sandy Johnson, Sheridan Mascarenhas, and William Drescher (students) under the supervision of Ellen Drost and Steve McGuire (Management Department faculty). A synopsis of the case study, one in a series of case studies being prepared on L.A. Entrepreneurs, is shown below.

American Apparel: Case Synopsis

American Apparel, Inc. was about to change from a private firm to a publicly traded company. It had become the largest vertically-integrated garment manufacturer in the U.S., bucking a trend in the garment industry to outsource manufacturing to low cost countries. Its founder and CEO, Dov Charney, was a self-proclaimed hustler whose style generated controversy that most publicly traded companies eschewed. Charney's open and frank attitude about progressive social issues and sexuality stirred up media feeding frenzies; the provocative photos he selected for American Apparel's ad campaigns grabbed people's attention - not always in a positive way. The very way the company had chosen to go public indicated much about the CEO's refusal to conform to tradition: in summer 2007 American Apparel would merge with the publicly traded specialty acquisition corporation, Endeavor. The company's commitment to paying high wages and generous benefits to its mostly immigrant workforce, and its "Made in USA" stance might not appeal to Wall Street investors who believed that an adequate return on investment took priority over political correctness. What changes would American Apparel need to make once it became a publicly traded company? Could it maintain its expensive manufacturing base in Los Angeles? Would outsiders' scrutiny of its CEO, its provocative marketing, and progressive personnel policies and social agenda force the company to make changes in strategy and culture

 

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